We believe personalized healthcare leads to better healthcare.

Genetic testing is revolutionizing how we approach standard care in the medical field. An individual can now obtain a personalized genetic blueprint that will educate the doctors in their community on how to specifically care for them. We aim to connect patients and their doctors with these genetic tests to improve and personalize their healthcare. Find out which genetic test would benefit you today. 

DID YOU KNOW

Poor medication adherence takes the lives of over 125,000 Americans annually and costs the health care industry nearly $300 billion a year (Iuga, Aurel et al., 2014)

DID YOU KNOW

Drug-drug Interactions account for almost 4 percent of all emergency room visits (National Academy of Science, 1995).

DID YOU KNOW

Drug-drug Interactions cost the US healthcare system $136 billion annually (Johnson, JA et al.,1995).

FAQ Tab

What is Pharmacogenomics

Pharmacogenomics is the study of genetic variations that influence an individual’s response to drugs. Pharmacogenomics is the combination of pharmacology and genomics. Pharmacology is the part of science that study how drugs work. Genomics is the study of a person’s genome including the interactions of those genes with each other and with the person’s environment. Each person responds uniquely to treatment, while one treatment approach may work well for one individual, the same approach may not be effective or may cause adverse drug effects in other patients. The implementation of pharmacogenomics helps physicians make informed treatment decisions. This will lead to better outcomes by decreasing adverse drug events and by increasing the effectiveness of drugs.

When is pharmacogenomic testing indicated or recommended?

Pharmacogenomics testing predicts how individuals will respond to medication. It is recommended for any patient who is receiving or will receive medications that have pharmacogenomics biomarkers indicated in their labeling.

FDA Website

Pharmacogenomics testing is also recommended for poly pharmacy patients and any patient who is receiving drug treatment.

Do I have to be an expert in genetics to order the comprehensive test? 

No. In fact, we are committed to providing intuitive tools for providers to use to make pharmacogenomic test results actionable. We also have clinical pharmacists on staff that are available for consultations to review results and answer your questions.
What medications are affected by the genes in the panel?

Results inform dosing recommendations for 220 commercial drugs.  All 220 drugs are directly influenced by the pharmacogenomic genes tested, and carry pharmacogenomic recommendations put forth by the FDA, EMA, and/or CPIC. 

View PharmGKB database of drugs with pharmacogenomics indications in their labeling.

https://www.pharmgkb.org/labels

How often should patients be tested?

Patients need only to be tested once, as genetic information does not change over time. Therefore, genetic testing results have lifetime utility.

If additional medications are added to the test, will they be added to test reports of patients previously tested? 

Our Labs regularly add new medications to the comprehensive test. The labs will automatically regenerate a patient’s report at no extra cost to include new medications, assuming the genes and alleles associated with the medications were on our panel when the patient was tested.

If, however, the genes and alleles associated with the new medications were not on our panel when the patient was tested, they will not be included on regenerated reports. If you would like your patient to have newly added medications included in their report, a new order must be created and they must be tested again.

How long does it take to get the test results?

Pharmacogenomics test results will typically be available within 7-10 business days following receipt of the sample at our lab.

Cancer Genetic test results will typically be available in 3-4 weeks following receipt to the patient samples.

BILLING

Billing codes
It is the responsibility of the submitting party to determine the correct billing codes to use when filing billing claims to third-party insurance. Below is a list of relevant codes.

GENE CPT code CPT code description
CYP1A2 81479 Unlisted molecular pathology procedure
CYP2B6 81479 Unlisted molecular pathology procedure
CYP2C19 81225 Cyp2c19 gene common variants
CYP2C9 81227 Cyp2c9 gene common variants
CYP2D6 81226 Cyp2d6 gene common variants
CYP3A4 81230 Cyp3a4 gene common variants
CYP3A5 81231 Cyp3a5 gene common variants
SLCO1B1 81328 Slco1b1 gene common variants
UGT1A1 81350 Ugt1a1 gene
CYP2B6 81479 Unlisted molecular pathology procedure
VKORC1 81355 Vkorc1 gene
F2 81240 F2 gene
NUDT15 81479 Unlisted molecular pathology procedure
F5 81241 F5 gene
OPRM1 81479 Unlisted molecular pathology procedure
COMT 81479 Unlisted molecular pathology procedure
DRD2 81479 Unlisted molecular pathology procedure
HTR2C 81479 Unlisted molecular pathology procedure
HTR2A 81479 Unlisted molecular pathology procedure
DPYD 81232 Dpyd gene common variants
GRIK4 81479 Mopath procedure level 2
IL28B (IFNL4) 81283 Ifnl4 gene
TPMT 81335 Tpmt gene common variants
SLC6A4 81479 Unlisted molecular pathology procedure
SLC6A4 81479 Unlisted molecular pathology procedure
CYP2C Cluster 81479 Unlisted molecular pathology procedure
CYP4F2 81479 Unlisted molecular pathology procedure
HLAA 81381 Hla i typing 1 allele hr
HLAB 81381 Hla i typing 1 allele hr
MTHFR 81291 Mthfr gene com variants

CLICK FOR MORE INFO: 2018 ICD 10 Data & Code Reference